Tuesday

Stroll on Dr Gerry McCann...


By Textusa

Three Little Words, Ten Huge Facts

I know I promised that in the next episode of the Smith Sighting Saga I would prove that Dr. Gerald McCann was The Luz Stroller, and I do apologise for not doing so right now. Because this episode is still about that episode at 10 p.m, on the night of May 3rd, 2007, Praia da Luz.

Not that I won’t or that I’m incapable of providing the proof, but, in the former episode I overlooked three little words, that I think are of the utmost importance, and wouldn’t fit in the line of thought that I intend to use in that post. And I do enjoy so much the smell of sweat on the McCann brow.

From Sky News I got the following:

“Martin Smith, from Drogheda in Co Louth, was on holiday in Praia Da Luz with his family when they bumped into the man just before 10pm on May 3 last year.The Smith family's suspicions were aroused because the man made no response when they asked if the barefoot child was asleep."He just put his head down and averted his eyes, which is very unusual in a tourist town at such a quiet time of the year," said Mr Smith.”

“IS SHE ASLEEP?”

Three simple words that tell us so, so very much.

FIRST, they tell us there was proximity. The Stroller was near enough for Mr Smith to think that he could start a conversation with the man.

SECOND, they tell us that The Stroller stopped. One doesn’t start a conversation with a complete stranger that is passing by. Eventually one could, if one is of extroverted type, say an “Oh, such a pretty little girl” but expect no response other than a smile. But when one asks a stranger a question, one expects an answer, and as is said “suspicions were aroused because the man made no response”

The only other situation I see that one would address a passing stranger would be if the carried child presented visible injury or was carried in such a manner that that could be assumed.

But then the questions would be either a concerned “Is she alright?” or a samaritan “Can I help?” but not a peaceful “Is she asleep?”

THIRD, they tell us The Stroller stopped, and stopped for a significant period of time.
One only starts a conversation with a stranger in one of the following two situations; either one feels comfortable to do so, or one feels uncomfortable enough to use conversation to break the awkward silence. Either way, a period of time must elapse.

As per significant period of time, I mean seconds, for example, the time for a caring tourist father to have apparently lost his way, momentarily, back to his holiday lodging in a strange town, while carrying his sleeping child.

FOURTH, they tell us that the Smiths not only assumed that The Stroller was not local, as he was an English-speaking person. Otherwise they wouldn’t have spoken to him, would they?

FIFTH, it tells us that there was a vocal interaction between The Stroller and the Smiths. One of the Smiths spoke directly to him.

As I’ve already said, he probably heard all of the family speak. In my opinion, much before he crossed paths with the first of the Smiths. Or heard the Grandparents talking some silly granny stuff to their grandchildren, and certainly heard the youngsters yelling at each other in their games up and down the stairs.

But all that is most likely. Certain is the fact that he was talked to. This, in turn, means that if he was a local, he got to know that that family before him was English-speaking; if he was a native English-speaker, he got to know that that family was Irish.

SIXTH, they tell us that the child was alive. No man with a dead child in his arms would act as The Stroller did.

From three simple words, SIX very valuable pieces of information can be extracted.

Read the rest of this article on Textusa's blog http://textusa.blogspot.com/2010/04/three-little-words-ten-huge-facts.html

Related: Chapter 8, "Maddie: The Truth About The Lie": A man with a child in his arms